EXPO2015 MILAN BAHRAIN PAVILION

Collaboration with  Armin Linke and Giuseppe Ielasi in the art film for the National Pavilion of the Kingdom of Bahrain, 2014 for the Expo 2015.
The pavilion done by Anne Holtrop as won the first prize invited competition.

Archaeologies of Green, the pavilion of the Kingdom of Bahrain, at the Expo Milano 2015 is a poetic interpretation of the cultural agrarian heritage of the country, which stems from the ancient civilization of Dilmun.
With ten distinctive fruit gardens, containing trees that will be fruit–bearing at different moments throughout the six-month duration of the exhibition, the pavilion also features archaeological artifacts that celebrate the millennia long tradition of agriculture and perpetuate the many myths of Bahrain as the location of the Garden of Eden and the land of the million palm trees.
Built out of white prefabricated concrete panels, the pavilion will be moved to Bahrain at the end of the Expo and once rebuilt will serve as a botanical garden. The prefabricated components of the buildings, visible through the seams that connect them to one another, loosely refer to the inherent and distinguished forms of the archaeology of Bahrain.

The installation, based on film and sound field recordings, attempts to reflect on agricultural spaces on the Islands of Bahrain, from traditional farming fields to intensive hydroponic greenhouses.
This fieldwork follows the narrative of an archaeology of the “invisible” knowledge infrastructures underpinning agriculture, from water and energy management, desalination and sewage cleaning plants, through geological and soil research, organic chemistry laboratories, to seed and plant vaults, biology laboratories, land use strategies and land ownership, financial and logistical food production planning and management on both the local and international scales.
How is this knowledge shared and transmitted? How is it connected to ancient tradition? How does it link archeology to contemporary narratives and display strategies, including the Pavilion space itself? Rather then providing answers to these complex interconnections, the artistic work tries to engage the public in opening up the space within which these questions resonate.

web link bahrain pavilion

web link anne holtrop website

anne holtrop, bahrain pavilion in construction, photo by Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno

anne holtrop, bahrain pavilion in construction, photo by Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno

architecture of green, film

architecture of green, film